Products & Services

The Council for Community and Economic Research

Training

The Council for Community and Economic Research is dedicated to improving the skills of community and economic development research professionals.  In cooperation with the LMI Institute, C2ER offers a comprehensive training program in economic development and workforce analysis.  Core courses include:

Impact Analysis for Non-Economists  Course Details Show Details
Course Type:  Specialized Training
Audience:  Community/economic development researchers and experienced labor market information analysts
Description:

This course will cover both economic impact analysis and fiscal impact analysis.

Economic Impact Analysis

This session introduces key concepts related to regional economic input-output framework.  Participants learn about relevant commercially available software and how to apply them in conducting economic impact studies.

This session will cover:

  • Overview and rationale for conducting impact studies
  • Data requirements for a study
  • Using available impact analysis software models (RIMS II, IMPLAN, EMSI, etc.)
  • Other types of impacts

Past instructors have included:

  • Terry Clower, Director - Center for Economic Development and Research, University of North Texas
  • Harrison Campbell, Associate Professor - Geography and Earth Sciences, UNC Charlotte

Preparing Fiscal Impact Studies

This session introduces the basics of conducting cost-benefit analysis.  Participants learn how to structure and undertake cost-benefit studies to better understand the fiscal consequences of a proposed project or policy.

This session will cover:

  • Introduction to the preparation of a fiscal impact study
  • Estimating costs:
    • Impact of economic incentives - When should they be used?
    • Average Cost - Per capita cost estimates
    • Marginal Cost - Case study approach
  • Estimating benefits
  • Setting the time frame: NPV, IRR, payback period
  • Case studies of fiscal impact situations in the real world
  • Introduction to the Fiscal Impact Tool
  • Pitfalls of fiscal impact studies

Past instructors have included:

  • George Erickcek, Senior Regional Analyst, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research
  • Daniel R. Gorin, Senior Community Affairs Analyst, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Regional Analysis Tools & Techniques  Course Details Show Details
Course Type:  Foundational Training
Audience:  Newer community/economic development researchers and experienced labor market information analysts
Description:

This course will cover topics important to researchers conducting a holistic analysis of regional economies.

Topics include:

  • Program evaluation
  • Measuring innovation and designing an innovation index
  • Strategic planning
  • Analyzing “engines of growth”
  • Conducting competitive market intelligence

Data-Driven Economic Development Research Techniques  Course Details Show Details
Course Type:  Foundational Training
Audience:  Newer community/economic development researchers and experienced labor market information analysts
Description:

This week long session introduces participants to the basic analytic methods for understanding their local or regional economy.

Topics include:

  • An overview of data needs for community economic researchers
  • The basics of economic impact analysis
  • Fiscal impact analysis
  • Conducting competitive market intelligence
  • Managing relational databases for the web

Basic Analyst Training  Course Details Show Details
Course Type:  Foundational Training - LMI Institute
Audience:  New labor market information analysts and community/economic development researchers new to workforce analysis
Description:

The purpose of this training is to provide analysts with an overview of the various available data sources to conduct analyses that support state and regional economic development or workforce strategies. This training provides insights into key workforce data programs followed by an overview of key economic and demographic data resources. Participants will be assigned exercises to find a variety of workforce, economic, and demographic data and asked to apply key analytic skills to practical, real-world questions that policymakers and practitioners encounter. The session will offer practical tips for experienced analysts on techniques to document the characteristics of a region's labor shed and economic base. The session will also explore techniques for communicating the results of regional workforce and economic analysis effectively to policy leaders and practitioners.

Participants will learn:

  • Workforce Data Sources and Programs
    • Key workforce information terms and concepts
    • Industry and occupational data sources and data structure
    • Key analytic tools
  • Regional Economic and Demographic Data
    • Federal statistical sources for economic and demographic data
    • State and regional economic data and their uses
    • Key demographic data tools
  • Basic analytic techniques
  • Selecting appropriate data sources, including “real time” and proprietary data
  • Examining key labor market characteristics that policymakers value
  • Communication tips for the web, policy briefs, and oral presentations

Past instructors have included:

  • Drew Conrad, Program Manager - Institute for Decision Making, University of Northern Iowa
  • Larry Less, Chief - Workforce Research, Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Labor Market Information Bureau (retired)
  • Mark White, Vice President for Research, Council for Community & Economic Research

Labor Market Applied Analysis Techniques  Course Details Show Details
Course Type:  Advanced Foundational Training - LMI Institute
Audience:  Experienced labor market information staff and community/economic development researchers
Description:

In this class, attendees will be assigned to small groups that will work together to apply the skills learned to a specific region.  Learn from instructors, your peers, and by doing during this highly interactive workshop.  Analysts should have basic knowledge of workforce research programs and principles (or have attended the LMI Institute's Basic Analyst Training class).  The session will build toward a final presentation on several potential scenarios.

This session will focus on defining the regional economy and its most important industries, introducing participants to key data tools, economic concepts, and analysis techniques.  The session will review key data sources and analysis techniques to examine industries and occupations, including location quotients, trend analysis, and shift share analysis as well as explore company-specific research tools.

Participants will learn:

  • What does our region’s economy look like (WIB/EDD)?
  • How do we prepare a snapshot of economically important industries for each region?
  • Which of these economically important sectors are adding jobs or dislocating workers?
  • Who are the key companies in our economically important sectors?
  • What occupations in our economically important industries are experiencing the greatest growth or decline?
  • How do we identify important regional clusters?
  • How do we identify in demand occupations?
  • Which industries employ those occupations and what do they pay?
  • What are the skills these in-demand jobs require?
  • Who are our workers?
  • Where are workers living and working?
  • Who is preparing future workers?
  • How do we present our findings to relevant audiences?

Past instructors have included:

  • Drew Conrad, Program Manager - Institute for Decision Making, University of Northern Iowa
  • Ed Feser, Professor & Head of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Mark White, Vice President for Research, Council for Community & Economic Research

How Cool Is Your City? Measuring Quality of Life  Course Details Show Details
Course Type:  Specialized Training
Audience:  Any labor market information staff and community/economic development researchers
Description:

Experts agree that “quality of life” is critical to your city’s ability to retain and attract mobile knowledge workers.  But how do you quantify and measure quality of life?  How do you use quality of life measures to shape and sharpen a civic agenda?  How do you become the “go-to” resource in your community when employers are seeking to attract and keep an educated, younger workforce?

During this training, “Cool School” participants will:

  • Gain insights about seven quality of life measures that make a city attractive to next generation workers
  • See their city’s data in a comprehensive index
  • Understand techniques to help them tell a story about quality of life in their community and how to use a “handprint” to influence a civic agenda
  • Participate in hands-on experiences to help translate metrics into real-life experiences participants can use in their own cities

Past instructors have included:

  • Rebecca Ryan, Next Generation Consulting

Marketing Labor Market Information  Course Details Show Details
Course Type:  Specialized Training
Audience:  Any labor market information staff and community/economic development researchers
Description:

An engaging and highly interactive seminar on the "M" word - marketing labor market information to your key stakeholders.  Learn about terminology, branding, targeting, and refining your products.  You'll also discover how to leverage social media and develop a customer satisfaction plan.  This is a hands-on, results-oriented seminar that will generate ideas and leave you with a solid path for reaching out to your customers!

Participants will learn:

  • Essentials of Marketing: Product, Place, Promotion, & Price; Research, Planning Execution, & Evaluation; Marketing Communications
  • Identifying Customers & Their Needs: Techniques for Conducting Research; Situation Analysis; Analyzing Your Products; Your Internal Publics
  • Preparing a Marketing Plan: What Your Research is Telling You; Product Modification; Developing a Communication Plan; Developing a Creative Strategy; Developing a Media Strategy; Targets in Your Plan
  • Executing the Marketing Plan: Who's Going To Do the Work?; The News Conference; Presentation Tools & Techniques; Media Buying; The Effective Campaign; The Secret of Structure
  • Evaluation Your Marketing Plan: Conducting Evaluative Research; Acting on Your Research; Measurement Tools & Goals
  • Best Practices: Opportunity for students to share experiences and ideas

Past instructors have included:

  • Don & Kay Norton, Norton Communications